T-2 Mycotoxin

Last reviewed: 6 Nov 2022
Last updated: 26 Oct 2022

Summary

Definition

History and exam

Key diagnostic factors

  • presence of risk factors
  • burning pain (skin or mucosal contact)
  • blistering rash (skin or mucosal contact)
More key diagnostic factors

Other diagnostic factors

  • erythema (skin or mucosal contact)
  • blurred vision/corneal damage (ocular exposure)
  • vomiting (ingestion)
  • diarrhoea (ingestion)
  • dyspnoea (inhalation)
  • cough (inhalation)
  • nasal irritation (inhalation)
  • necrosis (skin or mucosal contact)
  • bleeding (inhalation)
  • chest crackles and wheeze (inhalation)
  • tachycardia
  • hypotension
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • ataxia
  • prostration
  • hypothermia
  • coagulopathy
  • fever
Other diagnostic factors

Risk factors

  • occupational exposure
  • contaminated foods
  • biological terrorism
  • skin exposure
More risk factors

Diagnostic investigations

1st investigations to order

  • clinical diagnosis
More 1st investigations to order

Investigations to consider

  • pulse oxymetry
  • capnography
  • arterial blood gases
  • pulmonary function tests
  • chest x-ray
  • serum electrolytes
  • coagulation studies
  • FBC
  • mass spectrometry analysis of nasal, throat, or respiratory secretions
  • serum, urine, or tissue samples for toxin analysis
More investigations to consider

Treatment algorithm

ACUTE

all patients

Contributors

Authors

Scott Phillips, MD, FACP, FACMT, FAACT

Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine

Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology

University of Colorado

Faculty Member

Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center

Denver

CO

Associate Medical Director

Washington Poison Center

Seattle

WA

Disclosures

SP declares that he has no competing interests.

Peer reviewers

Darren Roberts, MBBS, PhD, FRACP

Clinical Pharmacologist and Toxicologist

NSW Poisons Information Centre

Associate Professor

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Camperdown

Australia

Disclosures

DR declares that he has no competing interests.

Maja Peraica, MD, PhD

Head Unit of Toxicology

Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health

Zagreb

Croatia

Disclosures

MP declares that she has no competing interests.

  • Differentials

    • Other vesicant exposure
    • Botulism
    • Food poisoning (other causes)
    More Differentials
  • Guidelines

    • Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) and chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN)
    • Mycotoxins sampling guidance
    More Guidelines
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