Screening

Women

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that all sexually active women under the age of 25 years should be screened for gonorrhea, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that this should be carried out annually.[60][61] Women who are 25 years or older should be screened if they have an increased risk for infection.[62] This includes women from a high-morbidity community (as defined by an increased prevalence) or those with individual risk factors (such as multiple recent sex partners, a history of an STI, a partner with an STI), and those connected to networks with the incarcerated, to the commercial sex trade, or to drug use. Low-risk asymptomatic women should not be screened. All pregnant women aged under 25 years and older pregnant women with risk factors for infection should be screened at the first prenatal visit.[61]

Men

The USPSTF cites insufficient evidence to support for or against routine screening in men at increased risk.[62] The CDC recommends that sexually active men having sex with men should have annual screening for gonorrhea at any site where exposure has occurred in the past year (urine, rectum, and throat), preferably by nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT).[23] Those at highest risk with multiple partners, anonymous partners, and associated drug use (such as methamphetamine or other club-related drugs) should be screened more frequently, up to every 3 to 6 months.[23] Low-risk asymptomatic men should not be screened.

Men or women with recent STI

The CDC recommends that people with gonorrhea be retested 3 months after treatment for recurrence of gonorrhea or, if this is not possible, whenever they next present for care after that in the first year.[23]

Pregnant women

The USPSTF and CDC recommend screening pregnant women who are at risk for gonorrhea (as listed in the section on screening in women).[23][62] The CDC also recommends retesting pregnant women during the third trimester if they remain at high risk for gonococcal infection.[23]

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