Case history

Case history

A 12-year-old white girl is brought to the emergency department by her parents due to 12 hours of rapidly worsening nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. Over the last week she has felt excessively thirsty and has been urinating a lot. Physical examination reveals a lean, dehydrated girl with deep rapid respirations, tachycardia, and no response to verbal commands.

Other presentations

The rate of beta-cell destruction varies in type 1 diabetes. In some patients, there may be a slow destruction leading to gradual onset of symptoms that is clinically indistinguishable from type 2 diabetes. When the initial presentation of type 1 diabetes occurs in adulthood, some refer to it as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). It is useful to distinguish LADA from type 2 diabetes, because patients with LADA usually require insulin therapy. Features that suggest the presence of LADA rather than type 2 diabetes include two or more of the following: age of onset less than 50 years, acute symptoms, body mass index less than 25 kg/m², and personal or family history of autoimmune disease.[2]

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