Dr Jonathan Mok: A North London GP's perspective

Providing comprehensive and holistic care.

By Dr Johnathan Mok
Oct 26, 2021

Enhancing patient care

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Dr Jonathan Mok is a GP Registrar in North London. Before he started his GP training, Jonathan was a senior house officer in ambulatory emergency care, where, by providing the interface between primary and secondary care, he helped to avoid unplanned hospital admissions. Dr Mok explains how BMJ Best Practice helps him to be more comprehensive and holistic when caring for patients.

“Working in general medicine, I see a lot of different conditions. We have so much to cover and it’s hard to keep track of what’s changed, so BMJ Best Practice is ideal to help me stay up-to-date and brush up on areas I’m unfamiliar with.

Even for the more routine things I see, like skin infections, BMJ Best Practice helps by outlining everything that should happen to provide the best care to the patient, including information I need from the patient, extra tests I should be doing or any community-follow up.”

"When I was recently treating a patient with cellulitis, I used BMJ Best Practice to see what investigations we should be doing and whether we needed to consider any comorbidities or any other conditions they have in the background, to enhance their recovery."

Dr Jonathan Mok, GP, UK

“In the ambulatory care setting, we frequently used the calculators on BMJ Best Practice. For symptoms like chest pain, we used a scoring system to see whether they were at high or low risk of a heart attack. BMJ Best Practice helped us to assess these patients and decide if they were appropriate to come to us.

By providing a detailed overview of a patient’s condition, BMJ Best Practice enhances the care I’m able to give to my patients. This information informs my decision-making and helps me to be more comprehensive and holistic in my care.

If a patient presents with a skin infection, I’m prompted to look out for other conditions that make people more vulnerable to skin infections. When I was recently treating a patient with cellulitis, I used BMJ Best Practice to see what investigations we should be doing and whether we needed to consider any comorbidities or any other conditions they have in the background, to enhance their recovery.”

“By using it frequently I’ve found that I’ve learnt things I hadn’t even realised I didn’t know.”

Dr Johnathan Mok, GP, UK

A tool for healthcare professionals of all grades

“There’s been quite a few times when we’ve discovered underlying diagnoses that patients didn’t have in the past, but because of BMJ Best Practice, we’re able to know what to test for, and what to look out for. I think doctors of all grades should be using BMJ Best Practice, and actually, in the broader sense, any healthcare professional that’s having contact with patients, like nurse practitioners.

BMJ Best Practice is an invaluable tool for keeping up with medical practice and the latest developments. By using it frequently I’ve found that I’ve learnt things I hadn’t even realised I didn’t know. BMJ Best Practice enables me to make the best decisions for the patient.”


BMJ Best Practice is free to all NHS staff and learners, funded by Health Education England.

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