Last reviewed: November 2017
Last updated: November  2017

Summary

Definition

History and exam

Key diagnostic factors

  • bed bug sighting
  • irregular linear erythematous papules
  • new skin lesions noted in the morning
  • pruritus

Other diagnostic factors

  • pain or burning
  • papular or diffuse urticaria
  • bullae
  • widespread urticaria/wheezing/stridor/hypotension
  • specks of blood or feces on sheets

Risk factors

  • high-turnover environment
  • recent travel
  • secondhand furniture in the home

Diagnostic investigations

Investigations to consider

  • skin scraping of lesion (mineral oil preparation)
  • skin biopsy
Full details

Treatment algorithm

Contributors

Authors VIEW ALL

Professor of Dermatology

Chair

Department of Dermatology

Boonshoft School of Medicine

Wright State University

Dayton

OH

Disclosures

JJT declares that he has no competing interests.

Resident

Department of Internal Medicine

Boonshoft School of Medicine

Wright State University

Dayton

OH

Disclosures

SLD declares that she has no competing interests.

Dr Julian Trevino and Dr Suzanne Dundon would like to gratefully acknowledge Dr David Carr, a previous contributor to this monograph. DRC declares he has no competing interests

Peer reviewers VIEW ALL

Chairman and Professor

Department of Medicine

Professor of Pediatrics

Billy S. Guyton Distinguished Professor

University of Mississippi Medical Center

Jackson

MS

Disclosures

RD declares that he has no competing interests.

Faculty Physician

Dermatology and Pediatric Dermatology

Phoenix Children's Hospital

Phoenix

AZ

Disclosures

XN declares that she has no competing interests.

Professor

Director

Medical Entomology Centre

University of Cambridge

Cambridge

UK

Disclosures

IFB has been a consultant to various manufacturers of pharmaceutical products, alternative therapies, and combs for treating louse infections. IFB is an author of several references cited in this monograph.

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