Last reviewed: November 2017
Last updated: October  2016

Summary

Definition

History and exam

Key diagnostic factors

  • exposure to Marburg virus in previous 21 days
  • fever ≥37.5°C (99.5°F)
  • myalgia
  • malaise

Other diagnostic factors

  • fatigue
  • diarrhoea
  • nausea/vomiting
  • severe headache
  • abdominal pain
  • sore throat
  • prostration
  • maculopapular rash
  • conjunctivitis
  • hiccups
  • difficulty breathing
  • anorexia
  • bleeding
  • tachycardia
  • hypotension
  • neurological signs
  • petechiae

Risk factors

  • living or working in, or arrival from, endemic area in previous 21 days
  • contact with infected body fluids
  • occupational exposure
  • bioterrorism

Diagnostic investigations

1st investigations to order

  • reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)
  • malaria investigations
Full details

Investigations to consider

  • serum electrolyte levels
  • serum creatinine and urea
  • blood lactate
  • ABG
  • FBC
  • coagulation studies
  • urinalysis
  • LFTs
  • serum amylase level
  • blood cultures
  • antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)
  • IgG antibodies
Full details

Treatment algorithm

ACUTE

Contributors

Authors VIEW ALL

Infectious Diseases Division

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston

MA

Disclosures

LB is the author of a reference cited in this monograph.

Peer reviewers VIEW ALL

Professor of Epidemiology

University of Nebraska Medical Center

Omaha

NE

Disclosures

MK declares that he has no competing interests.

Adult and Pediatric Infectious Disease Fellow

Emory University

Atlanta

GA

Disclosures

VR declares that she has no competing interests.

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